Expert Staffng http://www.expertstaffing.com Trust the Experts! Fri, 08 Jan 2016 14:43:49 +0000 en-US hourly 1 77779093 The Importance of Fact Checking Your Resume http://www.expertstaffing.com/2015/12/25/houston-fact-checking-resume/ http://www.expertstaffing.com/2015/12/25/houston-fact-checking-resume/#respond Fri, 25 Dec 2015 14:05:18 +0000 http://www.expertstaffing.com/?p=1144 As you create and edit the first draft of your resume and get ready to send it off to potential employers, you probably feel optimistic and confident. And you should! This is an exciting and inspirational time, and as you launch your job search, the world should feel like a place of opportunity and possibility.... Read more »

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As you create and edit the first draft of your resume and get ready to send it off to potential employers, you probably feel optimistic and confident. And you should! This is an exciting and inspirational time, and as you launch your job search, the world should feel like a place of opportunity and possibility. This is the time to get out there and show the world what you can do and what you have to offer!

But if you’re like most job seekers, after a few months on the job market, the shine begins to fade. Hopeful optimism starts giving way to concern, and maybe a little self-doubt. Instead of swelling with pride as you look over your resume, you may start feeling something more like worry. Or worse, inadequacy. Your proudest accomplishments may not seem like enough, and you may start believing that if you truly had something valuable to offer, you’d be working by now.

You may even be tempted to start embellishing your work history, “rounding up” your GPA, or slightly fudging your dates of employment. But resist this temptation. Your impressive accomplishments are still impressive, and your hard work is still as evident as ever. In addition to confidence, the only thing you need right now is patience. Here are few things to keep in mind as you sidestep the urge to rewrite history.

Your resume will stay with you.

After you’re hired, your new employers can do anything they choose with your resume. They can toss it in the recycle bin if they want to. But they probably won’t do this; instead, they’ll keep it on file indefinitely and refer back to it whenever you undergo a performance evaluation or negotiate for a raise or promotion. If your resume fabrications are discovered, even years down the road, this can have a damaging impact on your relationship with your employer. In some workplaces, it may mean immediate termination.

Your employers are savvier than you think.

Experienced employers (especially those who review entry level candidates) can usually recognize resume fabrications. Your adjustments may seem too small to notice or too reasonable to question, but consider giving your reviewers more credit. They know the business better than you do and can recognize an overstated accomplishment or timeline discrepancy when they see one.

This move can hurt your career.

If your employers spot a distortion in your resume, they may not tell you about it; they may simply drop your resume in the bin and place you on a do-not-hire list. This sometimes happens when candidates misstate their previous job titles or dates of employment, since these two data points are publically available and very easy facts to verify.

Remember: Confidence and honesty go hand in hand. So do desperation and truth stretching. Don’t fall into this easy trap. Just believe in yourself and be patient, and you’ll find the job you’re looking for. Turn to the staffing professionals at Expert Staffing to make this happen faster.

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Four Ways to Keep Your Teams Engaged During the Holidays http://www.expertstaffing.com/2015/12/18/plano-keep-teams-engaged-during-holidays/ http://www.expertstaffing.com/2015/12/18/plano-keep-teams-engaged-during-holidays/#respond Fri, 18 Dec 2015 14:05:41 +0000 http://www.expertstaffing.com/?p=1139 The holidays can be rough on productivity and the bottom line; vacations and half-days can take key players away from the office and create bottlenecks, but even when they’re physically present, employees are pulled away from their work by a host of seasonal distractions. Dealing with a temporary case of absent-mindedness during the holiday season... Read more »

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The holidays can be rough on productivity and the bottom line; vacations and half-days can take key players away from the office and create bottlenecks, but even when they’re physically present, employees are pulled away from their work by a host of seasonal distractions.

Dealing with a temporary case of absent-mindedness during the holiday season can usually be considered a cost of business. After all, hardworking employees deserve a break once a year, and if you allow them to reconnect with their families, bond with each other, relax a little, and take care of personal obligations, they’ll probably come back rested and refreshed in January. But in the meantime, how can you keep your teams from completely checking out before the work is finished? Here are a few tips to keep in mind.

Encourage communication.

Don’t threaten or implicitly punish employees who ask for vacation days or request help with their workloads during this busy season. Encourage them to provide this notice—the earlier the better. And make it clear that teamwork is the order of the day. Coworkers should cheerfully step in to share the burden and cover for each other, and if there aren’t enough hands to handle the job on a given day, roll up your sleeves and personally take on the task, push deadlines forward, or redistribute responsibilities.

Allow festivity.

Don’t act as though the holidays don’t exist. You don’t have to encourage celebration and goofing off, but don’t forbid a little cheer in the office. Non-offensive decorations should appear around the workplace, and employees should not be prevented from giving each other presents or bringing their traditions to work. In fact, consider regulating this process by holding an official luncheon or Pollyanna style gift exchange.

Let employees leave early before major holidays.

On the Wednesday before thanksgiving and the day before the winter break, allow employees to leave at noon. They’ll have more time to get ready for personal celebrations and they’ll appreciate this small gesture more than you realize.

Schedule reviews carefully.

Don’t schedule reviews in a way that forces managers to lose sleep and draft evaluations when they should be at home celebrating with their families. And try not to deliver harsh criticism or ambitious performance improvement plans right before sending employees away for a holiday break. This usually doesn’t yield positive, productive results. If possible, complete your performance evaluations in October or January.

For more on how to keep your teams on track, motivated, and present (at least partially) during a busy and distracting holiday season, reach out to the staffing and business management team at Expert Staffing.

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Body Language: How to Use it to your Advantage During an Interview http://www.expertstaffing.com/2015/12/11/houston-body-language-interview/ http://www.expertstaffing.com/2015/12/11/houston-body-language-interview/#respond Fri, 11 Dec 2015 14:05:53 +0000 http://www.expertstaffing.com/?p=1134 When you sit down for your interview with a potential employer, you’ll use your words to frame your background and credentials in the best possible light. Your descriptions and explanations will add depth and dimension to your resume, and you’ll answer every question that comes you way with style and aplomb. But your words won’t... Read more »

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When you sit down for your interview with a potential employer, you’ll use your words to frame your background and credentials in the best possible light. Your descriptions and explanations will add depth and dimension to your resume, and you’ll answer every question that comes you way with style and aplomb.

But your words won’t be your only tool. You’ll also be making use your gestures, posture, and facial expression. Even your breathing rate and the pauses between your sentences will add color and meaning to the things you say. And if you control your non-verbal body language, you’ll be more likely to send the right message. Here are a few tips to keep in mind.

Start BEFORE you enter the room.

Even as you travel to the venue and walk in the front door of the building, become the kind of person you would hire if you were in your interviewers shoes. Hold you head up high. Walk with a steady, confident gait. Smile and make eye contact with those in your path. Start thinking about these things before you reach the door—don’t try to undergo a full-body transformation at the threshold.

Handshake, smile, eyes.

This is the three-part gesture that begins every traditional interview session in almost every industry. It’s as old as time (almost) and as universal as cubicles and coffee makers. And yet, some candidates are still caught off guard by the extended hand and they still stare at the floor and mumble when it’s time look up and smile. Why does this happen? Because they’re nervous. And that’s okay. But for the three seconds it takes to execute this opening move, put your nerves on hold and step up.

Own your chair.

When you’re offered a chair, go ahead and have a seat. And as you do so, have the whole seat. Take over the entire chair, don’t perch at the edge. Don’t treat the chair like a borrowed object that you’re hoping to hand back in perfect condition. The chair is not a favor or a handout that you don’t deserve. You do deserve it. For the duration of the interview, make it your home.

Everything you say is true, important, and valuable.

From the first moment of the interview to the last, every word that comes out of your mouth will be important. There’s only one thing that this person (or people) have come here to listen to: your words. Your thoughts, opinions and stories are the reason for the meeting. So share them with dignity and generosity. Pause for two full seconds to assemble your thoughts before you speak. Your listener will be happy to wait.

For more on how to use your hands, face and voice to make a strong impression during your interview session, turn to the staffing and job search team at Expert Staffing.

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Three Ways to Reinvent your Performance Reviews http://www.expertstaffing.com/2015/12/04/sugar-land-reinvent-performance-reviews/ http://www.expertstaffing.com/2015/12/04/sugar-land-reinvent-performance-reviews/#respond Fri, 04 Dec 2015 14:05:33 +0000 http://www.expertstaffing.com/?p=1129 The end of the calendar year is just around the corner, and for most workplaces, this is the season of the performance review. Employees and employers everywhere are gearing up for some awkward conversations, and employers (surprisingly) may be losing more sleep over these looming conversations than their direct reports. The truth: Nobody enjoys this... Read more »

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The end of the calendar year is just around the corner, and for most workplaces, this is the season of the performance review. Employees and employers everywhere are gearing up for some awkward conversations, and employers (surprisingly) may be losing more sleep over these looming conversations than their direct reports.

The truth: Nobody enjoys this process. But what if you could avoid some of the negative consequences without giving up the necessary benefits that performance evaluations provide? What if you could reinvent your performance reviews and reshape the entire process to meet your needs? Consider these changes.

Imagine the endgame.

When your employees walk out the door after the review is over, how do you want them to feel? Employees who scuttle out like scolded cocker spaniels are probably not going to charge back to their desks with energy and engagement. More likely, they may be thinking about their families, their financial futures, and potentially launching a search for another job. Employees who are praised to the heavens are also not going to rush out and start making changes. Praise and acknowledgement are great, but you’re free to deliver good news and positive feedback every day of the year (and if it’s warranted, you should). Today, begin the review process with the end in mind. Be realistic.

No surprises.

If your employee walks in the door with no idea what “grade” he’ll receive, you’ve already fumbled this process. Feedback should be delivered all year long in a way that’s honest, constant, and low key. By the time review season comes around, employees should know exactly what to expect and this meeting should simply formalize a conversation they’ve already had a hundred times. Never notice an employee mistake and then wait six months to attack her with it during a formal review. This move does nothing to correct to the mistake or place the employee on the right track. At the same time, a high performing employee should not have to wait for an entire year before being told that she’s doing well.

Turn feedback into action and do so right away.

Your employee is impressing you at every turn: great! Your employee is struggling and disappointing you at every turn: not so great. In both cases, the emotional response you elicit from the employee will mean nothing to the company unless this response can be translated into action immediately. Make sure your A and B grade employees know exactly how to leverage their success. Consider pushing them to take on additional leadership roles or pursue a promotion to the next level. Your C and D grade employees should be told exactly how to improve their numbers. Your F employees should be told exactly how to avert a looming termination.

For more on how to keep your reviews positive, diplomatic, and actionable, reach out to the staffing team at Expert Staffing.

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Shy? How to Show Passion During your Interview http://www.expertstaffing.com/2015/11/27/sugar-land-show-passion-during-interview/ http://www.expertstaffing.com/2015/11/27/sugar-land-show-passion-during-interview/#respond Fri, 27 Nov 2015 14:05:37 +0000 http://www.expertstaffing.com/?p=1123 If the very thought of a high stake conversation with a stranger makes your palms a little sweaty, and you place job interviews among life’s most necessary but utterly dreaded tasks, you aren’t alone. There are plenty of places for shy people in the working world, even in positions of leadership. But in order to... Read more »

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If the very thought of a high stake conversation with a stranger makes your palms a little sweaty, and you place job interviews among life’s most necessary but utterly dreaded tasks, you aren’t alone. There are plenty of places for shy people in the working world, even in positions of leadership. But in order to make your way up the corporate ladder, you’ll have to work a little harder to express yourself and share your passion when you’re meeting face to face with potential employers. Here’s how.

Don’t wing it.

Before an interview, some relaxed, confident extroverts just get a good night’s sleep and then saunter into the room and speak from the heart. But in your case, there’s nothing wrong with a little planning and rehearsal. Or a LOT of planning and rehearsal. Draft your elevator pitch in writing and then practice it as many times as you need to in front of a mirror, your cat, or a willing listener. When you get nervous, your training will take over and you won’t be caught staring and stammering like a deer in headlights.

Think about the things you love.

Before your meeting, honestly assess what you love about your work and why you really want this job. Look past superficial details like your need to pay the rent. Dig deep and focus on the original passion that drove you into this field. Remember the conversations and events that first lit the fire in your heart, and be ready to envision or talk about these things as you speak with your interviewer.

Own the space around you.

It won’t do to simply instruct a shy person to not be shy. If tips like “be bold” or “speak loudly and confidently” actually worked, you wouldn’t be worried. But here’s one simple tip that really can make a difference in the message you send: occupy and own the space around you. Take over the entire chair, don’t just perch at the edge. The chair belongs to you as long as you’re in it, so use the armrests, use the back rests, and make yourself at home. A confident posture speaks louder than any words.

Don’t get flustered.

Your interviewer can—and probably will—present you with a few challenging questions that suggest you don’t belong here, you don’t deserve this job, or even that you’ve done something wrong. If you start feeling defensive, cornered, uncertain, or anxious, stop talking. Just take a slow breath and count out two full seconds (or more) before you speak. This pause and this commanding silence can reset the conversation and remind you that you deserve this opportunity and you’re great at what you do. Remember, this conversation belongs to you. Take all the time you need to make this clear.

For more on how to show confidence and passion even if you’re not comfortable during your interview, reach out to the staffing team at Expert Staffing.

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Could Your Business Use Holiday Help? http://www.expertstaffing.com/2015/11/20/houston-holiday-help/ http://www.expertstaffing.com/2015/11/20/houston-holiday-help/#respond Fri, 20 Nov 2015 14:05:17 +0000 http://www.expertstaffing.com/?p=1120 The holiday season is just around the corner, and if your business tends to experience a spike in traffic or new orders at this time of year, you may benefit from a few extra hands. The seasonal crush tends to impact companies in food and beverage, retail, and services that customers need during this busy... Read more »

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The holiday season is just around the corner, and if your business tends to experience a spike in traffic or new orders at this time of year, you may benefit from a few extra hands. The seasonal crush tends to impact companies in food and beverage, retail, and services that customers need during this busy time, which can involve anything from gift sales and distribution to entertaining and catering. Streets need to be cleared, decorations purchased and put in place, and both private individuals and big corporations need gifts, event planning services, food, and people to serve and prepare that food.

If you’ve been through the holiday rush before and your employees barely survived, that’s no good. It’s even worse if your lack of personnel caused you to turn down new orders or turn customers away. But a little temporary help can prevent that from happening again. Consider the benefits of holiday hiring.

Seasonal help can be deployed on short notice.

If you contact our office and arrange an appointment, we can provide the help you need. Even if you need that help immediately. We’ll listen to your needs and we’ll do everything we can to mobilize the staff that can help you stay afloat.

Temporary employees aren’t your employees.

Your temporary teams are managed and paid by the staffing agency, not by you. Not only does this remove the burden of payroll and tax reporting issues, it also frees your attention and time so you can focus fully on your business.

Contingency employees can become full time employees if you choose.

If your contingency or temporary workers thrive in your workplace and you value their efforts and contributions enough to take them on full time, you’ll be able to do so as soon as your contract period ends. Temporary employment allows both parties to test the relationship before making a long term commitment.

Contingency employees bring specific skill sets to the table.

“Temporary employees” used to suggest clerical or unskilled labor only. But that was a long time ago. These days, employment agencies can find and connect you to employees with highly specific skill sets; just let us know what your positions entail and explain the qualifications you’re looking for.

Temporary employees come with low risk.

Our temporary teams are thoroughly vetted and interviewed by our staff before they ever reach your door. And in the rare event of a mismatch, we’ll reassign your employee and provide a replacement.

For more on how to make it through the hectic holiday season without missing a beat, reach out to the staffing team at Expert.

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Who Should You Avoid Using as a Reference? http://www.expertstaffing.com/2015/11/13/athens-who-to-avoid-using-as-reference/ http://www.expertstaffing.com/2015/11/13/athens-who-to-avoid-using-as-reference/#respond Fri, 13 Nov 2015 14:05:41 +0000 http://www.expertstaffing.com/?p=1116 As you assemble a list of references to submit to prospective employers, you carefully choose every name. You make sure these are people who can be trusted, people who will speak well of you, and people who have the native intelligence, critical thinking skills, and social savvy that can turn your flaws into assets and... Read more »

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As you assemble a list of references to submit to prospective employers, you carefully choose every name. You make sure these are people who can be trusted, people who will speak well of you, and people who have the native intelligence, critical thinking skills, and social savvy that can turn your flaws into assets and your assets into the selling points that can land you the job. You’re choosing former bosses, professors, industry experts, and mentors. But are there any people in your life who you should avoid listing at all costs? If you have any of these characters in mind, remove them before you finalize your list.

Family Members

Even if your family member is a seasoned professional with no sense of bias and integrity to spare, leave them out of the reference process. There’s one exception: If your family member owned a business and you worked for that business, feel free to include them. Otherwise, don’t expect testimony from your parents or siblings to convince a stranger to hire you.

Peers and Friends

If you consider your former boss a “friend”, that’s fine. But if your potential reference is your own age, shares your experience level, and has never managed you or worked with you in a professional context, think twice before using this person’s name. Most managers can tell if the reference they’re speaking to is a drinking buddy or roommate, and this leaves them with a simple question: Why couldn’t the candidate find someone else?

Absentee References

Will your reference disappear at the time of a scheduled phone call from your employer? Will he or she forget to call the person back or fail to return their email messages? This kind of slip-up may be an innocent accident, but it sends a specific message to potential employers: This person wants to dodge the conversation. The question is, why?

Neutral References

Of all the categories of people NOT to include on list, these are the ones who can cause the most harm. If your chosen contact doesn’t remember you very well, doesn’t know very much about your skill sets, or simply doesn’t care if you land the job or not, that’s no good. Neutral references can be toxic for your job search, and if your contact simply shrugs in the face of tough questions or blandly lets you fall under the bus, it’s better to leave them out of the process altogether. Choose only enthusiastic supporters who will jump through hoops and go to extremes to help you achieve your goals.

For more on how to choose a list of references who will represent you well and move your career forward, reach out to the job search team at Expert.

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How Important is Employee Engagement? http://www.expertstaffing.com/2015/11/06/sugar-land-employee-engagement/ http://www.expertstaffing.com/2015/11/06/sugar-land-employee-engagement/#respond Fri, 06 Nov 2015 14:05:59 +0000 http://www.expertstaffing.com/?p=1111 Business management gurus and leadership blogs seem to lean heavily on the word “engagement”, as if this word contains magic secrets that can activate trust and team success. But what exactly is engagement? How does this quality boost overall workplace productivity? And when it’s working for you, how can you tell? Engagement means focus and... Read more »

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Business management gurus and leadership blogs seem to lean heavily on the word “engagement”, as if this word contains magic secrets that can activate trust and team success. But what exactly is engagement? How does this quality boost overall workplace productivity? And when it’s working for you, how can you tell?

Engagement means focus and commitment.

A small gear has the power to turn a larger gear, and once the large gear begins to turn, other gears can attach to any point on that large circumference and put their own systems into action. But before any of this can take place, that first tiny gear has to mesh into the system. If this doesn’t happen, nothing happens. An ambitious, intelligent employee gazing out a window and thinking about the upcoming weekend is like that tiny gear. They’re spinning in place, expending their energy while the rest of the machine fails to benefit from her knowledge, talent, and problem solving skills.

Engagement can channel resources in the right direction.

Maybe that employee is an expert in a specific area, but their job description doesn’t allow them to apply that expertise very often. Maybe they’re experienced and seasoned, but their responsibilities are similar to that of an entry level employee, and they’re bored. Maybe they don’t feel that their contributions are being respected, so they’re scaling back those contributions. Maybe they don’t trust their boss, so their interest in his or her approval is minimal. In any case, they’re a valuable resource. But their value—whatever it may be — isn’t being tapped. If any of these channels are adjusted, that value might flow forth. A new boss, a shift in responsibilities, or a renewed sense of mutual trust and respect can go a long way.

Engaged employees display specific traits.

As Tolstoy might say, disengaged employees are disengaged in their own ways, and for their own reasons. But engaged employees are all the same. A fully engaged employee displays traits like these:

  • They move around the office instead of hiding at their desk all day.
  • They’re known by their colleagues; they don’t drift in and out anonymously like a ghost.
  • They search for new work and responsibilities instead of sitting still and waiting for assignments.
  • They know how their individual tasks support the larger enterprise.
  • They seem happy to be in the office, not miserable or distracted.
  • They cares how their ideas and contributions are received; they feel bad when they make a mistake and proud when they do well.

Engaged employees aren’t always the ones who work the longest hours, and they aren’t the ones who never make mistakes. But they ARE the ones who care the most about the company, its mission, and their role in team success. For more on how to boost engagement in your workplace, contact the staffing professionals at Expert Staffing.

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Facing a Career Transition? A Recruiter Can Help http://www.expertstaffing.com/2015/10/30/carrollton-career-transition-recruiter-can-help/ http://www.expertstaffing.com/2015/10/30/carrollton-career-transition-recruiter-can-help/#respond Fri, 30 Oct 2015 14:05:58 +0000 http://www.expertstaffing.com/?p=1106 When you’re ready to make a major career shift from one field or industry to another, the path isn’t always clear. As it happens, vertical career ladders tend to be cut and dried, and moving up often involves impressing superiors, taking on more responsibility, and gaining promotions within or beyond your current workplace. But lateral... Read more »

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When you’re ready to make a major career shift from one field or industry to another, the path isn’t always clear. As it happens, vertical career ladders tend to be cut and dried, and moving up often involves impressing superiors, taking on more responsibility, and gaining promotions within or beyond your current workplace. But lateral moves are harder.

Almost every working person climbs from the entry level to the mid-career rung eventually. But not everyone attempts a mid-career shift from education to manufacturing, or from healthcare to retail. And as you start planning your shift, you may benefit from the support and guidance of an experienced recruiter. Here’s how.

Recruiters have wide networks.

Most professional recruiters spend their days (and years) making strong connections and forming relationships in an ever-expanding professional network. And while many experienced pros focus on a narrow subsection of a narrow, specific field, they also maintain contacts with employers, workers, managers, and business decision makers across multiple industries. Their networks tend to be wide, deep, and stable. When you connect with a recruiter, you benefit from WHO they know, not just what they know.

Recruiters are excellent listeners.

Your circumstances may be complex. After all, if you’re making a career move from medical equipment sales to network administration, you probably have an excellent reason, and behind that reason there’s probably an interesting story. But don’t worry. A professional recruiter will listen to that story and read between the lines. Recruiters don’t get very far by tuning out, acting on assumptions, or interrupting candidates before they finish speaking. Clearly explain your needs and the details of your situation; your recruiter is listening.

Recruiters are excellent coaches.

You may not know much about your chosen field, and you may be embarking on the very first steps of what might be a long journey. But your recruiter can help you lay out a plan and follow through. If you’re just getting started, she can point you to the education, testing, and certification requirements you’ll need for success. And if you already have those credentials and you’re ready to hit the job market, she can help you understand what your target employers are looking for.

Recruiters can help you find work while you make your move.

You’ve left your old job behind, but you aren’t quite ready to search for a job in your new field; you still need a few years of school or a few months of training before you find your feet. But you’re in luck. An experienced recruiter can help you find temporary or transitional employment while you work toward your goals. Keep the paychecks coming while focus on your future career path. And when you’re ready to complete the shift, your recruiter can help you across the final bridge.

For more on how to complete your career transition with a little professional help, reach out to the team at Expert Staffing.

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Candidate Selection: Consider Personality http://www.expertstaffing.com/2015/10/23/austin-candidate-consider-personality/ http://www.expertstaffing.com/2015/10/23/austin-candidate-consider-personality/#respond Fri, 23 Oct 2015 14:05:57 +0000 http://www.expertstaffing.com/?p=1101 As you sift through stacks of resumes and listen carefully to candidate statements during interviews, how heavily do you weigh each element of a given applicant’s profile? You might be searching for signs of relevant experience, or signs of clear confidence and competence in specific skill areas. If you’re like most hiring managers, you’re also... Read more »

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As you sift through stacks of resumes and listen carefully to candidate statements during interviews, how heavily do you weigh each element of a given applicant’s profile? You might be searching for signs of relevant experience, or signs of clear confidence and competence in specific skill areas. If you’re like most hiring managers, you’re also keeping an eye out for red flags and indicators of potential trouble. But if you aren’t adding personality traits into the mix, you may be missing out on excellent candidates and placing too much value on potential mismatches.

During the hiring process, personality matters. And while there are no inherently “good” or “bad” personalities (usually) there are definitely traits that can indicate a match or misalignment with your existing workplace culture. Pay close attention and keep these tips in mind.

Learn from the past.

Remember three years ago, when you hired that sunny, cheerful, well-meaning go-getter who proved to be a terrible fit and left the company within a few months? Remember how the newbie disrupted your dynamic and alienated every member of an otherwise functional group? What exactly went wrong? Cheerful go-getters (or competitive winners who always get straight a’s, or hard-charging change-drivers) may seem like a perfect bet, but if they don’t fit in, they won’t work out. And if they get restless or bored, they won’t stay. Don’t choose generic traits that seem great on the surface; choose traits that actually work for your team.

Ask the candidate what makes them happy.

An interview is not an academic exam, and the candidate isn’t on trial. This isn’t a one-way, pass-fail assessment. It’s a conversation, and if the candidate won’t be happy here, both of you should recognize this upfront. Make sure you clearly understand what your candidate needs and wants, and if you’re not sure you can offer these things, discuss this possibility in an open, honest, and respectful way.

How well do you get along?

If you’ll be directly supervising your candidate once they’re hired, think about this during the interview. Imagine chatting with this person on a daily basis, and working together with him on problems and issues that require close cooperation. Can you see this happening? Do you enjoy this person’s company? Do you have any interests in common, or a similar sense of humor? Pay attention to the rhythm, pace, and mood of the conversation. If this dialogue feels fluid and functional to you, make a note of it. If you’re feeling too many awkward pauses and uncomfortable misunderstandings, don’t expect this to go away once the person is hired.

For more on how to make the most of your interviews and choose the best applicants for your open positions, reach out to the Texas staffing professionals at Expert.

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